External recorder or monitor-recorder: why do I need one?

best on camera recorder

Deciding on new camera gear is always tough and you have to focus on which product is right for you.

I have owned and used on camera monitor-recorders for a long time. I originally bought a Atomos Samurai when I bought one of the first Red One cameras in Australia. The reason this was a great option to add to the Red camera was because it allowed me record a video stream with matching file names and timecode (to the RAW recording) the Red camera was doing. This allowed more options in post production as well as allowing for playback on set. This was in the very early days of the Red before the cameras could play back the footage. These two features alone were more than enough reason to buy the Atomos.
Continue reading “External recorder or monitor-recorder: why do I need one?”

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Gear reviews

Coming soon are gear reviews. I will post what gear I use and why I use it. I will let you know how the gear stacks up to professional use on set. I’ll describe the advantages and disadvantages to any of the gear. I work on a wide range of productions, tv commercials, corporate and web videos so can recommend gear that’s versatile and worth considering taking on your next shoot.
Also if you have questions on film and tv gear let me know and I will pass on an industry veteran opinion.
With the range of gear options increasing everyday it’s important to know what works well and why.
First up I will let you know about my lighting gear and will give the pros and cons for HMI lighting.
Happy shooting til then.

Move it with Michelle

Michelle Bridges

Unless you have been living under a rock, surely almost everyone is familiar with the kickass reputation of Aussie TV personality and trainer Michelle Bridges.

Tim Bradley at Minds Eye Films certainly knows now that she applies this can-do attitude across all areas of her life, and especially so in her training programs.

Continue reading “Move it with Michelle”

Sony commercial shot on Red Epic

Sony is no stranger when it comes to making magnificent advertisements. Their new commercial for the recently released A7 and A7R full frame mirrorless cameras, which features some magnificently choreographed skydiving action, is no exception. What’s even more impressive is the fact that none of this was shot on a green screen. In fact, the entirety of the spot was shot practically at an altitude of 15,000 feet, with an overcranked RED EPIC.

Sony commercial shot on Red Epic

Now here’s the behind the scenes

BTS Sony / Red Epic shoot

How much fun would it have been seeing a skydiver with an F65 strapped to their helmet 🙂

Red Sue Sony

Red_vs_Sony

Red Digital has started to sue Sony Corp for patent infringement. The Red’s complaint claims that three cameras made by defendants Sony Electronics and Sony Corporation “all embody the subject matter claimed in Red’s asserted patents without any license.” The federal court filing adds that “Red is informed and believes and thereupon alleges that the sale of Sony’s unauthorized, infringing cameras has resulted in lost sales, reduced the business and profit of Red, and greatly injured the general reputation of Red.” Alleging two instances of “willful and wanton” patent infringement on technology used in its Red One camera, Red is seeking a court order that its patents are “valid and enforceable” as well as an injunction against Sony’s F65, F55 and F5 cameras to stop their further sale and have them destroyed.

Jim Jannard, founder of Red says “This is a REDCODE RAW issue… one that many have acknowledged for years as a core invention of RED and incredibly important to what we all are doing…… REDCODE RAW is not “rounded corners”. It is fundamental to recording high resolution images on camera to small media. It is brilliant. And it is no surprise that others have finally figured out (several years later) that the only way to get where they need to go is through this path.”

This will probably take along time going through the courts, but may just make people reconsider their purchase of a Sony F5, F55 or F65 as if Red wins they may all have to be destroyed.

Samurai and Tim Bradley work together

www.sydneycameraman.net.auThe Samurai recorder is a great piece of gear. I bought this pro res and Avid codec recorder for two main reasons.

First it will let me offer 10 bit recording with my Xdcam F800 camera. This will be great for any green screen work, or work where there is high detail in the back ground. The advantage of 10 bit of 8 bit recording is that in simple terms the editor has alot more information to work with, therefor can push the limits further.

The second reason is to be able to offer a direct to edit option with my Red Epic camera. When the Samurai is used this way it will eliminate the need to transcode the Epics camera files (R3Ds) means a far faster post solution. Another use is to make proxy files for offline editing. I recently used the Samurai on a shoot with my Epic as a great, quick replay device. The director could replay any shots while I was setting up the next shot with the camera.

The Samurai is a leader in its area. It is small, easily operated and has the  lowest power consumption. It is a great addition to my extensive range of gear.

Field of View Comparator – Epic, Arri, Canon, F65

Ever wanted to know what the field of view of different cameras are and be able to compare them … well now you can.

Able Cine has made this great tool and they have recently added all the new cameras from NAB 2012. The new cameras include the Canon C300, C500, and 1DC. The C300 and C500′s sensor is almost exactly the same size as Super 35mm film; at 24.6×13.8mm it has a 28.2mm diagonal. The 1DC can record in both HD modes and in a 4K mode. The HD mode uses the full frame sensor area just like the 5D Mark III, however the 4K mode uses a smaller APS-H mode, like the 1D Mark 4. All these options are now available in our tool.

Additionally, they’ve added the Blackmagic Digital Cinema camera to the list, which has a sensor size somewhere between Super 16mm film and a 4/3rd sensor like on the AF100. At 15.8×8.9mm it has a 18.14 mm diagonal, which leads to a fair bit of cropping when compared to Super 35mm and full frame sensors. The Blackmagic Camera can record in both HD (ProRes, DNxHD, and uncompressed) as well a full 2.5K 12-bit Raw format. The Raw data is captured in Cinema DNG format at a resolution of 2432×1366, however the captured image area is the same, so you should get the same field of view in either mode.